“Verbal Tics”


There’s an out of control verbal epidemic gripping  media commentators urging them to answer posed questions… with an opening statement of “look” or “listen…”  This is a public speaking verbal tic behavior, where we see and hear broadcast news analysis… conveyed in ways that make respect and cordiality seem missing…

Similar to tick parasites surviving by feeding off mammal blood, verbal tics seem to feed off the life of a listener’s enthusiasm to learn… most folks find verbal tics annoying, irritating, and the fuel driving a distracting burn.

There are several verbal tic categories… One group called “unconscious fillers” describe innocuous oral padding speakers use… to buy time, collect thoughts and settle nerves.  “Um,” “ah,” “like,” “well,” “so,” and “you know” are common fillers… one observes. When spokespeople have eye contact with their audience it’s much more difficult to say “um” or “ah”… so they look away sending a signal they’re “searching” for the next important thing to say.

The second category of verbal tics… called “attention grabbers…” are intentional irritants from those seeking command, these tics not only provoke us… but disrespectfully test… both our individuality… and… on the issues for which we stand.  As listeners, we feel when commentators use words such as “look,” listen,” “to be honest,” “make no mistake,” and “don’t you agree”… that they’re intentionally trying to impose their views upon us as the only ones we should see.

While both filler and attention grabber verbal tics detract from respectful and meaningful sharing… fillers are more excused due to listener empathy toward understanding nervousness and fear of public speaking.  It’s a Funny Feeling to Know however… attention grabber tics convey exposed arrogant and narcissistic TRAITS… attributes… the authentic communicator might best avoid in any knowledge sharing he or she CREATES…

Copyright Alan P. Xenakis, MD, Doc X MD and Audra RN Funny Feelings© Air Date 20181108

 

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